Ecologists & Sociologist views wanted: Species found together

trinker

ggplot2orBust
#1
I am curious about some ecological statistics/scores.

I believe that across times species of animals may migrate to different locations. This movement is likely due to resources (or in the human population interests as well).

I posit that we can measure the migration (amount of migration) using diversity indices or richness measures (e.g., simpson & shannon). So the more diversity the more area covered. Please critique that thinking.

Now I assume that socially species or groups migrate together. So for instance if deer move from one area to another due to abundance of resources then deer ticks would move with them as well. Other species are less dependent (either symbiotic or host in their relationship) and thus are less likely to migrate together. Please critique that thinking.

Lastly, is there a type of score/measure that detects what species tend to be found together, or what human populations tend to be found together? Or some way to determine what species would migrate together?
 

TheEcologist

Global Moderator
#2
I posit that we can measure the migration (amount of migration) using diversity indices or richness measures (e.g., simpson & shannon). So the more diversity the more area covered. Please critique that thinking.

I don't follow your logic here. Species richness tends to increase with area sampled yes... is that what you mean?
 

TheEcologist

Global Moderator
#4
Yes. Sorry using language in an area I'm very unfamiliar with.
Aah yes, well species richness and diversity mean two different things. In Ecology, diversity takes into account the frequency distribution among species while species richness is just a count of the # species. For instance we have two sites in which we count species and individuals within each species;


Site 1
A 98
B 1
C 1

Site 2

A 40
B 22
C 38

Site one and site 2 both contain species A,B and C so they are equal in species richness yet site two has greater diversity (i.e. entropy) than site one as species are better represented here.

So did you mean species richness or diversity, cause there is a difference.

TE
 

hlsmith

Not a robit
#7
I had seen in the past some social epidemiology work looking at utilitarian and symbiotic relationships trying to model this. But I don 't recall a measure of diversity.
 

trinker

ggplot2orBust
#8
@Bugman I'm reading up on your thoughts right now. Great lead. The paper you linked was terrific too. Thanks for people's thoughts thus far.
 

trinker

ggplot2orBust
#10
@spunky possibly. But I'm thinking about kids interacting with centers in a class room or how much a teacher walks around the room. I'm looking at movement and how pupils move together.
 
#12
I posit that we can measure the migration (amount of migration) using diversity indices or richness measures (e.g., simpson & shannon). So the more diversity the more area covered. Please critique that thinking.
I don't follow your logic here, can you offer more information? You wonder if you can measure the "amount of migration" (do you mean distance covered by an individual, population, or species, the number of species from a community that migrate together, the area used for a migratory route - the path, or what?) using the diversity or richness of what? Diversity or richness of the communities a population moves through? Diversity or richness of the group migrating?

Now I assume that socially species or groups migrate together. So for instance if deer move from one area to another due to abundance of resources then deer ticks would move with them as well. Other species are less dependent (either symbiotic or host in their relationship) and thus are less likely to migrate together. Please critique that thinking.
Do you mean a cyclical migration(seasonal) or climate change driven migration? Ticks can be carried or can "over-winter" in the soil while waiting for new hosts/warm weather.

Lastly, is there a type of score/measure that detects what species tend to be found together, or what human populations tend to be found together? Or some way to determine what species would migrate together?
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1466-8238.2012.00789.x/pdf
 
#13
Anybody with the account name EvoEco is gonna have your answer Trinker.

Just don't tell them that this is raptor related data that you are using for evil purposes.