Good day

hlsmith

Not a robit
#2
I love it - AlexanderC. You are in good company then. We look forward to your posts and questions!

I practice in the medical field and some times I liken statistics to a physician who wants to master every discipline (e.g., endocrine, neurology, infectious diseases, etc.), which would be near impossible task. But I find myself also trying to achieve the same impossible task in statistics in wanting to learn everything (e.g., frequentist, Bayesian, machine learning, time series, multilevel models, etc.).

What areas of statistics are you currently working or interested in?
 
#3
I love it - AlexanderC. You are in good company then. We look forward to your posts and questions!

I practice in the medical field and some times I liken statistics to a physician who wants to master every discipline (e.g., endocrine, neurology, infectious diseases, etc.), which would be near impossible task. But I find myself also trying to achieve the same impossible task in statistics in wanting to learn everything (e.g., frequentist, Bayesian, machine learning, time series, multilevel models, etc.).

What areas of statistics are you currently working or interested in?
I know the feeling, I always feel like I have so much to learn in so little time :D It is a healthy pursuit at least.

Frequentist statistics are used most frequently ( :cool: )in my field of study, so it is my main goal to learn as much of this as I can. If I can do this it would be nice to look at some Bayesian but this scares me. I also started programming and want to learn some machine learning if this would be possible for my brain. Maybe it is also a bit specific but I am particularly interested in learning more about signal detection theory - do not know how common this is on this forum though.
 

hlsmith

Not a robit
#4
For clarification, what context are you talking about for signal detection. This forum recently changed software platforms and since we currently have lower traffic, but there is a wide array of topics and contributors. The formality and level of discourse is usually much more approachable for newbies than some other well know forums. @Miner and @rogojel are two on again off again contributors whom seem like they may be familiar with detection in the industry setting.

Which language have you started programming in? I have found it is all about slow and steady acquisition of knowledge, and then things start to click. Your coursework will also help guide you.
 
#5
I don't really know how to describe the context for signal detection, other than applying signal detection models to data collected in psychology experiments, and using SDT to better understand human perception for example. Of course it would be useful to learn how this is applied in other areas.

I have started Python. It doesn't seem to be very conventional for statistics but I see a growing trend and want to stick with it.