I am having trouble getting a normal bell curve out.... - Any help is appreciated. Will pay

hlsmith

Less is more. Stay pure. Stay poor.
#3
Sounds like you have count data, which can be represented by the Poisson distribution. If the mean is large enough, 8 or higher, the Poisson data can be approximated by the normal distribution. What are your mean and variance values?
 

obh

Active Member
#4
Poisson makes sense :)

> fitdistr(data1, "Poisson")

lambda

1.31425234

(0.03918343)

Code:
library(MASS)
data1<-c(1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,3,3,3,3,3,3,3,3,3,3,3,3,3,3,3,3,3,4,4,4,4,4,4,4,4,4,5,5,5,6,6,6,6,8,8,9,11,11,11,12,14
)
fitdistr(data1, "Poisson")
 
Last edited:

katxt

Active Member
#5
It looks like Poisson may work. It's definitely not Normal.
The mean and variance of the Poisson are equal which yours are roughly 1.31 and 1.24, but you probably also need the number of days with zero sales included as well.
 

noetsi

Fortran must die
#6
The data itself may or may not have to be normal. For instance in regression the raw data does not have to be normal just the residuals. I am not sure what test you are running. There are btw software, including I think some excel ad ons which will superimpose a normal curve over your data.
 

katxt

Active Member
#7
Just thinking. Poisson isn't the best because with a mean of around 1 or 2, you should not see anything above about 6.
In the meantime, you can use the data itself as its own probability distribution and use a Monte Carlo technique.
You could also consider zero-truncated negative binomial but that's getting rather obscure.
 

hlsmith

Less is more. Stay pure. Stay poor.
#9
Just thinking. Poisson isn't the best because with a mean of around 1 or 2, you should not see anything above about 6.
In the meantime, you can use the data itself as its own probability distribution and use a Monte Carlo technique.
You could also consider zero-truncated negative binomial but that's getting rather obscure.
Can you elaborate on the MC
 

katxt

Active Member
#10
It depends on what the fitted normal was going to be used for. If you wanted a confidence interval for the mean, for instance, you could do a bootstrap CI using the actual data. You could compare one area or period with another using a permutation test. If you wanted to do a risk analysis which involved sampling from the real fitted distribution, then sample from the data.
However, I think one thing is clear. The Normal is not a suitable distribution to try and fit.