Laptop

hlsmith

Less is more. Stay pure. Stay poor.
#1
I am going to purchase a laptop for home use, most like will place newer Microsoft operating system on it. Uses will include:

-basic Microsoft Office tasks: PowerPoint, Word, etc.
-playing around with stats (SAS, R, maybe Python), no big data.
-perhaps some other basics (watching movies, streaming)
-some searching the web.

I am looking to keep it pretty clean and not give it alot of general internet use, just office and stats, perhaps watching some lectures.

Does anyone have any suggestions or preferences. Seems ThinkPads keep coming up, but I am open to others. My work has some type of discount with Lenovo, HP, Dell, and Apple, though unsure if the discount will amount to much.

Budget: preferrably around $500, but could spend more say $750 or so. But I fret about spending too much for anything that may be outdated in 3-4 years.

Thanks in advance, I am hoping to make a decision soon before I spend the money on bills.



P.S., I know little to nothing about RAM, Processing, etc.
 
#2
I would suggest you get an Acer - they're very good laptops, and they're cheaper than other more reputable brands.

The only thing you may want to look out for is having a multi-core processor and a decent amount of RAM if you're going to run some computation-intensive functions in SAS/R/Python. I would look to get something with at least an i3 processor with 8 GB RAM.
 
#3
I'll put a plug in for Asus. Also a less expensive brand, and I have been very happy with mine. I chose it over the Acer because I found the keyboard was far more comfortable to use. I'd definitely suggest trying them out in the store before purchasing if you can.
 

hlsmith

Less is more. Stay pure. Stay poor.
#4
I'll put a plug in for Asus. Also a less expensive brand, and I have been very happy with mine. I chose it over the Acer because I found the keyboard was far more comfortable to use. I'd definitely suggest trying them out in the store before purchasing if you can.
Which one in particular do you have, what specs? And do you run stats regularly on it?
 
#5
BTW, you mentioned that you didn't want to spend too much on something that would be outdated in 3-4 years.

I wouldn't worry about that so much. Computer specs only get outdated quickly if you play video games. I suppose over the long-term you *could* be concerned about eventually having to upgrade to a newer OS that the laptop doesn't have the specs to handle. But if you get a new computer today, it would take at least 15-20 years before that becomes a concern (the time that the newer OS takes over, and existing softwares are no longer supported in the current OS).

I'd be more concerned about how well the laptop will physically hold up after a few years. Mine (an HP) is about 2 years old, and the knob as well as some of they keys are starting to fall off.
 
#6
Mine is almost two years old, so is no longer available on the market, I suspect. I think I paid about $750 for it. (I know there are Asus machines that go for much more than that, so this was the low end of the market.) It does have a touchscreen and Win 8.1 (came with 8). I'm finding 8.1 to be much easier. I leave it on the desktop view so I don't usually even have to mess with the stupid tiles. So far, it is physically standing up very well. The only problem it has is a small crack on the corner of the lid where it was dropped. I keep meaning to glue the missing piece back in, but somehow always forget. Keyboard, touchpad, and screen all still working like new. The only glitch that seems to happen is the touchscreen will stop responding on occasion -- maybe once a month or once every other month. Quick reboot takes care of it.

I do not regularly run stats on that machine -- I use my work machine. That one is a still-almost new Dell with 8 Gig of RAM, Win 7 Enterprise, and (supposedly) a super-fast Intel Core i7 processor running at 2.7 GHz. I give it a resounding "meh." Definitely wouldn't recommend. SPSS chokes it on occasion. Even a very large Excel file has crashed it more than once.

And I agree with Injektilo about upgrading. I come from a computer family and it's ingrained in me that you don't want to get the cheaper stuff that isn't upgradable. So what? By the time you want to upgrade, something better is out there and is probably cheaper anyway. It runs against my "waste not, want not" mentality, but it is the way the market works right now.
 

hlsmith

Less is more. Stay pure. Stay poor.
#7
It runs against my "waste not, want not" mentality, but it is the way the market works right now.
I hear that. Thanks for all of the information, it is appreciated. I have a ThinkPad at work with i5 inside and it handles everything. Doesn't hurt that an IT department pushes out patches and protects it behind a firewall.
 
#8
There are many laptop company in the world. One of them , i like dell. It is really good. The dell has three size, small, medium and big. You can choose any from them. You should buy Intel processor. Because it is the best. From above discussion, i am saying you to buy a Dell laptop which performance is the best of all Laptop. Thank you.