Linux

Dason

Ambassador to the humans
#22
Still sounds like somewhat of a pain compared to LaTeX. But I'll definitely admit there's some anti-Office bias embedded in my opinions.
 

TheEcologist

Global Moderator
#23
Hi Ecologist,
How did you setup the VI r plugin. I followed the step in the following link.
http://www.vim.org/scripts/script.php?script_id=2628
But i didn't get the icons in GVIm. I also tried the deb in this link. not getting the icon in GVIM. highlighting is working when i open .R file. Not sure how to run R commands in VI mode.

I recently bought a netbook for my linux experiments. N450. Installed Ubuntu Remix 10.04.
---------------------------------------
Apart from this I tried Arch linux. It was not succesful. I will try arch in my desktop.
I tried MeeGo linux. This is like downgrading netbook to mobile phone/tablets.
Hee Vinux,

Sorry I completely missed your query!

I don't use vim, I don't like the look and feel. I do however love its power!
Therefore I opted to integrate gedit (which is decent looking modern editor, you can easily customize) with Vim. So I advise you to get ViGedit in combination with Rgedit.

The author of ViGedit sums it up nicely:

I’ve been having inner turmoil about text editors for a while. On the one hand, I realize that Vim is super-powerful, and I should use it. On the other hand, I don’t know a lot of commands, and I frequently find that I actually get more work done in gedit. This makes me not use Vim, and then I forget a few commands I used to know, and then when I do use Vim it’s a worse experience than before.

Luckily, there’s a solution: the ViGedit gedit plugin. It lets you use all your favorite Vim commands from within gedit.

Sweetness.
I have been hopping from editor to editor, even tried emacs, but I prefered vim for some reason - however with these two plugins I'm sticking with gedit (I have allot more installed btw there are many great gedit plugins).
 

TheEcologist

Global Moderator
#24
Oh and you might want to enable automatic syntax highlighting for R.. e.g. when you open a document the system automatically recognizes and highlights the R code.

To do this (Linux);

Edit your /etc/mime.types and add something like the following in the text/x-??? parts:

Code:
 text/x-R                    .r
 

Dason

Ambassador to the humans
#25
I found a new music player that I really like. Guayadeque is quite customizable and to tell the truth is pretty much what I've been looking for for quite some time. Clementine is great but Guayadeque has the ability to move things around and choose which tabs are shown/hidden and it is awesome. The only things I really want from music players are the ability to play all of my music, I appreciate last.fm support, and the ability to have something similar to an iTunes style browser. But this just goes above and beyond that and allows you to customize things in a very intuitive way. It might not be quite as flashy as Clementine/Amarok but that doesn't concern me too much.
 

TheEcologist

Global Moderator
#26
I found a new music player that I really like. Guayadeque is quite customizable and to tell the truth is pretty much what I've been looking for for quite some time. Clementine is great but Guayadeque has the ability to move things around and choose which tabs are shown/hidden and it is awesome. The only things I really want from music players are the ability to play all of my music, I appreciate last.fm support, and the ability to have something similar to an iTunes style browser. But this just goes above and beyond that and allows you to customize things in a very intuitive way. It might not be quite as flashy as Clementine/Amarok but that doesn't concern me too much.
Trying it out right now!
 

vinux

Dark Knight
#28
I have tried few more Linux distributions.
1) Fubuntu - I didn't like it.
2) Joli OS - One of the best for netbook. Similar to meego, But, you could install all the ubuntu apps. Already installed R.
3) CrunchBang Linux - black screen background is good. (Not able to install from pendrive)
 

Dason

Ambassador to the humans
#29
Have you tried Arch Linux yet? It's not quite as easy to get up and running but it can be very lightweight and is a rolling release.
 

vinux

Dark Knight
#30
I guess the issue is installing ARCH Linux from USB stick. Netbook doesn't have the CDROM. I am very much impressed by ARCH linux. ( The reviews on this distro is very good). I will try it in my Desktop.
 

bugman

Super Moderator
#32
Hey, thanks for asking The Ecologist!

Well, I began using Mint 11, which I loved. However, I found a few bugs in it which put me off a little bit. I tried to install PCLOS Gnome, but I just couldn't get it to run on my system. I am currently using Ubuntu, which I like, but I am going to move on once I update my machine. I am unable to get the most out of Linux right due to processor limitations. Compiz seems to muck my settings up.

It's really taken some effort to get things set up so far. But overall I love it.

Thanks to your advice I have windows installed in VB which is running my PS lightroom.

I am learning GIMP and darktable in the Linux environment for other photo editing.

As for R. I tried RKward but honestly, I didn't like it. I am currently using R-studio, which I love but am keen to try others (maybe JGR?). I was interested in Links post on Emacs etc...so I may try that at some point too. We are spoiled for choice!

I hated Banshee. it was too slow and unresponsive. I am currently using Clementine and I'm finding that pretty sweet!

I am still unsure about KDE vs. Gnome, but I'm sure with time I'll figure it out. I was interested in Dason's comments on Arch. Its a bit advanced for me right now, but I have seem some demos on you tube, and it looks nice.

Thats about it right now. I am loving the way my computer now boots from stone cold off to operational in no time and I am definitely not missing those **** update balloons in windows. I have had a few issues with my mic not working and other little bugs, but the Linux community seems to be very understanding of new users and very willing to help. Just like yourself!
 

TheEcologist

Global Moderator
#33
Ubuntu is a good choice overall, I bet you'll find the most support there (as it has by far the most users). It also has a windows installer which usually gets your system running very 'painlessly' (is that a word?).
I'm not using RKward, Rstudio or JGR anymore. I'm stubbornly sticking to VIgedit with Rgedit, it is going slowly but I'm sure the learning of VIM commands are starting to pay off (because I've impressed colleagues during a workshop ;) ).
I also abandoned Compiz in favor of stability and more system resources (but then I switched to e17 :) ).

VIM demonstration here
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pCiVCiku3cM&feature=related
emacs here
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EQAd41VAXWo&feature=related

Only after using linux a long time do I feel comfortable enough to start learning VIM.

I also had microphone problems in the beginning, but once you've figured it out you'll know what to do in the future.

Keep us updated on your adventure.
 
#36
I've got a few questions and this may not be the proper thread. I apologize if it is not. I am hopefully moving into grad school for stats the following year and have used Linux off and on with a dual boot. I assume I will be using quite a bit of R and LaTex compiling. Maybe this thread is biased, but is windows or Linux better for statistics/statisticians (especially one's in headed into grad school)? Is there any pro's/con's to one or the other.

If Linux is preferred so is it fairly simple to run wine and office through Linux....I really don't want to dual boot again if possible. Thank you!
 

Dason

Ambassador to the humans
#37
If you couldn't tell I'm quite a fan of linux. I would recommend learning it and loving it. I personally think almost anything to do with programming is easier in a linux environment.

With that being said I wouldn't recommend throwing away all ties with Windows. There is quite a bit of software that is Windows only. Just today I was thankful for having one of my computers having XP on it because an analysis I need to do requires some special software which is Windows only... it's a pain but I have to deal with that. Also if you plan on using Microsoft Office it's just a lot easier to run things natively but if you have the processing power you could try to do things in a virtual box.
 

bryangoodrich

Probably A Mammal
#38
I tried Ubuntu awhile back, but I got annoyed by the lack of unified components that Windows provides. I like to drag-and-drop things or display things in a certain way, and Ubuntu either didn't have native support or required a lot of tweaking to get it done. There is something to be said for Macs and their user-friendliness. I get that out of my Windows. I just love Linux for the vast functionality it has, and with Cygwin and other components, I can get a lot of that within Windows. Still, Windows is a resource hog, and I'm thinking of transferring over to the latest Ubuntu. The problem is I'm lazy. Migrating all your stuff and setting everything up again can be a real pain. If I'm going to do it, though, I better do it soon. School is about to start! I much rather not do it during the semester. I may just get a new PC altogether with Windows 7. I really like the latest Windows. They finally did things right with it, and I use it at work very efficiently. If that's the case, I'll have no problem just turning my old box into a Linux box. What I'll do with it, who knows, but it could become my development platform to use into the future.

Besides Ubuntu, which is very user-friendly, and I love the Debian package manager, I also like SUSE. I think it has a great utilities manager (YaSt), but that is a bias I get from using it for my Linux class back in the day. I haven't touched Linux in awhile, now.
 

bryangoodrich

Probably A Mammal
#39
Also if you plan on using Microsoft Office it's just a lot easier to run things natively but if you have the processing power you could try to do things in a virtual box.
OpenOffice has a lot of compatibility with MS Office, at least the earlier Office. I would think they'd keep with the times and still be quite compatible with the latest Office, no? Also, a lot of programs can be ported through WINE pretty well. It really has trouble when programs are complex, like requiring the .NET framework and a bunch of other dependencies. More basic things (e.g., Keepass, a great password database utility I couldn't live without now) can easily be ported through WINE giving it a very native feel and look.
 

Dason

Ambassador to the humans
#40
OpenOffice has a lot of compatibility with MS Office, at least the earlier Office. I would think they'd keep with the times and still be quite compatible with the latest Office, no?
It's definitely not a carbon copy. There are some features that just don't get ported if you open a MSOffice document in OpenOffice. I've also seen some (not too complex) documents get messed up in terms of spacing and alignment

Also: I had a long rant written before and I swear I posted it (like five minutes ago) but it's not here anymore. To summarize: What do you mean by "I got annoyed by the lack of unified components that Windows provides"? One of my favorite things about Linux is the package management which provides (in my mind) a more unified experience/system.