Masters Degree...online or in-person?

#1
Hi all! :wave:

I'm working in NYC and looking to get a part time masters degree in Statistics. The only schools that offer a degree in the city are Columbia and CUNY. Columbia's got a great reputation but is so expensive, while CUNY is cheap but doesn't have much of a reputation.

The other option as I see it are online programs such as those offered by Texas A&M and Iowa State. My question is: would it be better to get an in-person degree from CUNY, or an online degree from a reputable school like TAMU or Iowa State? I can provide more information on my background if that makes a difference.
 

Mean Joe

TS Contributor
#3
Disclaimer: I'm not too familiar with the online programs (such as Texas A&M, Iowa St.). But are these online degrees at the same level of "credibility" as the in-person degree? Also another question that I'm wondering, would you not have to meet in-person at least some time, to get a masters degree?

A masters degree is a pretty powerful thing to have, how would they confirm that you are yourself doing the work? Without ever seeing you?

My apologies because I really don't know much about the other options (which is why I never said anything earlier) but I don't see why not go to CUNY? The online degrees may be more expensive(?) than CUNY, but that doesn't make CUNY any lesser. You can learn the same thing at CUNY as at the online universities; you can learn the same thing at the online universities as at CUNY.

Regarding the cost of colleges, in my opinion:
The value of a university is in making connections/networking; that's what justifies the cost of Harvard/MIT over other universities. The coursework of Harvard/MIT is freely available online, complete with professor's notes. You can find videos of lectures, free too. From a purely educational view, the only thing you're missing is a guy in glasses and a sweater standing by a chalkboard. So what are you paying $100,000s for?
 
#4
I am getting my MBA online, and I agree with Mean Joe. Make sure they are fully accredited, because many people - especially older generations - look upon online degrees with a lot of suspicion. Save your projects and be VERY prepared to talk about how hard you worked and what you learned when discussing with potential employers. You would do this anyway, but I think the online prejudice is still very prevalent.

My personal thought is you get out of an education what you put into it, in or out of the classroom. You can sleep through or skip lectures. You may have terrible profs. It is the same online. I find my online classes to be a lot more work, since I have to show up virtually and prove that I am invested and interested. My math classes have been terrible, hence my joining this site. I am getting ready to go ask my first stats question, and see what kind of help I can get. I have been all over Youtube and the internet trying to put the pieces together that I did NOT get from reading my stats textbook.

I cannot over-stress how much nicer it is to be able to work and go to school, though I do not have time for much else. I am required to have a proctored exam semesterly, and I have to go to my local library and fill out some paperwork...etc. If you have any questions, let me know. I'm only in my third semester, but I find I'm loving and hating it. I want my time back, but I am certainly learning a lot. .

Best,
Dani
 

Data

New Member
#5
I currently am doing my stats masters degree at a CUNY and it is going well. There is no way i'd pay for the columbia prices. What you have to remember is when going to get your masters from a 'less reputable' institution is that what you do with your degree all depends on you. If you are willing to work hard and willing to find work I see absolutely no problem with getting your degree at CUNY, you will be learning essentially the same stuff as if you went to columbia. There are great minds and ideas at CUNY. Why waste all that money at columbia, doesn't make sense to me.

As for the internet vs. in class debate. I just value the in class experience more and that's that, I guess that depends on you and your availability and schedule. I am fairly young I guess and I am still a full time student.
 
#6
There are programs being developed online for people like you. Depends on how you learn.

In an online class you can't procrastinate and should have things backed up in case something happens. You might not get an immediate response (good to research what it takes to take an online class and what to expect).
 
#7
Hi all! :wave:

I'm working in NYC and looking to get a part time masters degree in Statistics. The only schools that offer a degree in the city are Columbia and CUNY. Columbia's got a great reputation but is so expensive, while CUNY is cheap but doesn't have much of a reputation.

The other option as I see it are online programs such as those offered by Texas A&M and Iowa State. My question is: would it be better to get an in-person degree from CUNY, or an online degree from a reputable school like TAMU or Iowa State? I can provide more information on my background if that makes a difference.
Both are good. With online you can easily manage your studies according to your work timings. By this there will be no loss to your work and you don't need to travel any where for this.



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