Online Masters Degrees

#41
BTW bryangoodrich, I asked around about the USC GIS program, it is not about $40K but they also have a certificate program. The program for both the MS and cert involves spending one week in Catalina island for Remote Sensing field work. Some URLs:

recent webinars: http://gis.usc.edu/media/webinars-podcasts.asp
Catalina Island video: http://gis.usc.edu/webtemplate_video/catalina.wmv
Schedule of Classes: http://web-app.usc.edu/soc/ Summer classes are listed under Spatial Science.
USC Spatial Science: http://spatial.usc.edu/

furthermore, I think another alternative (at least for me) could be online programs in Analytics, DePaul and Nortwestern both have Masters in Predicative Analytics via Distance Ed. CUNY has a Masters in Data Analytics. These programs has some stat component obviously but lean more toward using current tools to get data mining/insight results. Just my 2 cents.
 
#42
Would anyone get a MS in stats if they did not need it for work? Or could one pick up enough on there own? I love stats but do not necessarily need the degree....so I am up in the air about just self studying through material, there is plenty online. Im concerned the cost will have no return and be unnecessary.

Thanks for any comments.
 
#43
Hi hedge, your question is something I struggled with for a long time. the short answer is it depends on how far you want to use stats to further your career. I work in market research for 5+ yrs and stat knowledge beyond a 1st yr course is a nice-to-have for me, not a must-have (right now). after 5 yrs, I feel stagnant at my job but also feel that adding more stat knowledge could enable me to move into my company's quant group or get another job outside. I decided getting a lot more stat knowledge would be critical for my career. I wanted to learn it and have some experience as well as a piece of paper to show for it, since I personally think experience AND formal education are both what employers are looking for in stat/big data roles now.

Self learning is a great option through sites like Coursera but it is not for everyone. I tried coursera and really appreciated the dedication shown by the prof. and fellow students, but the fact that those courses don't lead to formal degrees sapped a lot of motivation for me to follow, given my already super-busy schedule. I needed a formal program with actual grades and deadlines to whip me into being more disciplined and given my schedule, I had to do it via an online program. If spending some money (not a lot) is not an issue, I'd suggest you consider my path - I first enrolled in a data analytics certificate program on statistics.com, and just last week I got accepted to the CUNY MS Data Analystics program for the fall semester (I will now drop the statistics.com certificate plan to focus on CUNY). both places are the cheapest stat or big data program you will find online (and I think they do a solid job)good luck
 
#44
Thanks calyp I appreciate the thoughtful response.

I don't know if will add value unless I switch career paths, except just to my general thought process. I enjoy it enough though that I am willing to do the MS and a PhD would be fun too.

I guess my real question was mostly if you are a dedicated self-learner how far can one take themselves in stats....can you learn enough on your own or is a structured environment better up to a certain point. Maybe someone who has a MS or is pursuing a PhD can add value to that question as they could advise how learn able the material is by oneself.

Either way I am going for the MS at this point...I am curious about the question though.
 

spunky

Doesn't actually exist
#45
Maybe someone who has a MS or is pursuing a PhD can add value to that question as they could advise how learn able the material is by oneself.
i truly believe this really depends on what kind of learner you are. i love doing self-studying but i have to say that there are times where maybe i'm struggling through some difficult concepts, then i go ask a prof (or a more advanced colleague) and they say something like "well, why don't you think about it in such and such way?" or "there's this nifty trick that gets you through these kinds of problems" and suddenly, bam! what was taking me weeks to understand suddenly gets solved in minutes. but really, that depends on what kind of person you are. i know i'm not a genius so i know there are times where i'm going to need a seminar or a class just to make sure someone who's more experienced on the topic can get me started with getting familiar with the basics. things can get really complicated very quickly at the graduate level.

i do believe, however, that the real value of my PhD education comes mostly from being able to sit in a room with other smart people and bounce around ideas just for the sake of it.
 
#46
Thanks that was really helpful. I would easily pay for that because I am no genius and it is super helpful to learn tricks and resources that one may never find on their own.

What about after a MS if one is still interested....I suppose there is no other route but to got the PhD route to learn the core classes? I had always heard the value was in the research the last two years so I liked where you placed your value...interesting.

Thanks Spunky and calyp
 
#47
Hi hedge, your question is something I struggled with for a long time. the short answer is it depends on how far you want to use stats to further your career. I work in market research for 5+ yrs and stat knowledge beyond a 1st yr course is a nice-to-have for me, not a must-have (right now). after 5 yrs, I feel stagnant at my job but also feel that adding more stat knowledge could enable me to move into my company's quant group or get another job outside. I decided getting a lot more stat knowledge would be critical for my career. I wanted to learn it and have some experience as well as a piece of paper to show for it, since I personally think experience AND formal education are both what employers are looking for in stat/big data roles now.

Self learning is a great option through sites like Coursera but it is not for everyone. I tried coursera and really appreciated the dedication shown by the prof. and fellow students, but the fact that those courses don't lead to formal degrees sapped a lot of motivation for me to follow, given my already super-busy schedule. I needed a formal program with actual grades and deadlines to whip me into being more disciplined and given my schedule, I had to do it via an online program. If spending some money (not a lot) is not an issue, I'd suggest you consider my path - I first enrolled in a data analytics certificate program on statistics.com, and just last week I got accepted to the CUNY MS Data Analystics program for the fall semester (I will now drop the statistics.com certificate plan to focus on CUNY). both places are the cheapest stat or big data program you will find online (and I think they do a solid job)good luck
I'm considering CUNY, Northwestern, and Depaul.

I know you're early in the program but how would you rate the CUNY programs rigor, quality of professors, quality of the coursework? There's not a lot of information online from students so any insight you can provide is appreciated.
 
#48
Dear Bryan,

could you please tell me your experience after taking your MS is stats from iowa state online ?..because i'm interested in this program online also,so i want to know your opinion.

Thank you very much.
 
#49
1)is there is any defference between the on campus & off campus? i mean regarding the career opportunities,market place & issuing a phd.

2)is ISU is the best choice ?

3)what's my cahance probaility in finding a job in USA after finishing my master & is it equal to the oncampus one ?

4)does the certificate impy by any way to the issue of benig nline" ?

5)does they rely on minitab or SAS or R ?

thank you very much.