Preparing CV/Resume

noetsi

Fortran must die
#41
Yeah, my current position only one person was really tech savvy, and she was also getting her 2nd doctorate lol She could understand the skill set I could bring given that I've got real analysis experience, know the software and the field, have a stats background, can handle IT stuff and especially databases, and my new found GIS skills was just icing on the cake! I'm this educated and this talented and have averaged maybe 11K a year over the past decade. I am so done with California lol
I have four graduate degrees (including a doctorate in public management and a Master's in Measurement and Statistics) and earn 40k :) :( I gag when I hear about how education is key to higher income. Actual analysis of data shows with rare exception graduate degrees never pay off financially.

It has nothing to do with Cali.
 

bryangoodrich

Probably A Mammal
#42
It's been awhile since I've posted my update, but there's been quite a number of changes I've made to my resume. Principally, I've focused on a one-page resume format instead of a CV format. Below I offer my current format and a colored version inspired by a web developer online resume that impressed me. I doubt I'd ever use it, but I thought the grouping color enhances does an amazing job, whereas the B&W version emphasizes the separation of groups. I think the difference is dramatic, even if it would go entirely unnoticed (as it should be) by somebody not trying to recognize the design principles involved.

Anyway, a lot of this format takes from my previous design principles (some of which still come from Hadley's CV), but uses some content ideas I got from a Forbes article focused on programmer resumes. I think it delivers a lot of content, even though I still had to cut a lot out and generalize other things. It has the flexibility to allow me to swap examples and projects to focus on different jobs. As it stands right now, it's very general, for like an entry level data scientist position (emphasizing both statistical and quantitative skills as well as programming and coding experience).

The resume is also constructed in a 'linear' format, such that I can literally copy-paste it entire a text editor and it'll all be organized the same. This means it'll be read by software (as some HR companies do) the way I intend it to be read. The Forbes article came with a template that used tables for everything, and there is absolutely no reason to use tables! For instance, my work experience is still columnar by how I used center-tab and right-tab breaks.

https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/72101655/resume.pdf
https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/72101655/resume - colored.pdf

Thoughts? Suggestions?
 

trinker

ggplot2orBust
#43
Couple of Grammar things I noticed:

There's some debate but I would use Ph.D. for PhD Consulting
Spell out — Psych
I'd use APA6 on the citations (including hanging indents and periods after initial of people's first names)

Why not list your computer languages?
 

trinker

ggplot2orBust
#44
Couple of Grammar things I noticed:

There's some debate but I would use Ph.D. for PhD Consulting
Spell out — Psych
I'd use APA6 on the citations (including hanging indents and periods after initial of people's first names)

Why not list your computer languages?
 

bryangoodrich

Probably A Mammal
#45
Shortened because it would push onto another line and go onto a second page. The Forbes lady said no more than half of your bullets should run onto two lines. Keep them short.

I don't think the PhD vs Ph.D. makes a big difference to an employer, but I think I can change the research methods clause to something like "Psychology Research Paper." That should fit fine.

As for computer languages, there's no room, and I might throw it into the cover letter to emphasize it to an employer that wants to know those details. Instead, specific languages and topics or whatever are included on the bullets where experienced with them was gained. This came from the Forbes example, and I liked it. There's a lot of redundancy: e.g., R), but that'll also layer on the significance of that which gets repeated--I use it a lot!

If I included languages on the resume, I'd want to separate out those that I'm proficient in vs those that I'm merely familiar with. The Forbes person made a point that you don't want to list a language unless you're proficient with it unless you emphasize the difference in quality. Otherwise, if you say you can do java, then you better be able to whip out a Java example during an interview if they asked. I might be able to wing it, but I am by far not that proficient in all the **** I know! lol
 
#46
I think the points should be also sorted according to importance. Besides, the following CV point is told in a way the reader might underestimate your abilities:

"Designed spatial maps, heat maps, and dashboards for visual summary and exploration; R, Tableau, Excel, QGIS."

I would revise the above point to something more serious looking. Especially the word "Excel" in that line makes the reader quite underestimate you.
 

bryangoodrich

Probably A Mammal
#47
Depends on the business. A lot of firms want you to know how to use Excel. It's a major piece of software in business. In terms of the work I've done, I have used it in my reporting and visuals.
 

bryangoodrich

Probably A Mammal
#48
Trinker, I made Ph.D. work and it does kind of come off a little more professional looking I think. I had to use "summary" instead of "summaries" but I think it works, even if it sounds a little odd. It also looks a lot better with "Psychology Research Paper" which I made the rest of the lines consistent in title case like that where appropriate. As for the citation, of course you'd recommend apa! The article was published using the format they use in those health journals, so I stuck with it. To me I think it has better organization of author and dates and such than apa.

Thanks for your help, everyone. I think my resume has come along nicely. Now to find a job that can utilize my skills to which I can apply!
 
#49
I agree with the post above. The real question is to ask what your purpose and goal is for your CV or resume. Ultimately the goal is to land a job. The problem most people have is the fact that they have very little to no work experience to put on a CV or a resume. Although experience is something that an employer will look for, the ultimate goal should be to “sell” a potential employer on your reliability and competence. Your resume or CV should focus on the skills and experience you have developed over time due to your choice in activities and work. Volunteering for various groups can help compensate for a lack of employment experience. Just as importantly, it really is more about how you sell yourself and your skills than it is the actual experience itself. Show creativity and the ability to solve problems, work as a team, and move the person who will be hiring you toward their own goals.