Which Tests to Run

z77

New Member
#1
I have a questionnaire with different data nature, each few questions can be grouped into 1 variable (ex: Age, Gender, Region, Income Level into "Background"; Experienced Side Effects (multiple answers), Hospitalization (yes/no) into "Risks"...). I transformed the groups by means but would like to know how to proceed to analyze the relationships
Here's are the hypotheses:
  1. There is a positive relation between consumer background and consumer behavior regarding the use of food supplements in Lebanon
  2. There is a positive relation between consumer’s health awareness and consumer behavior regarding the use of food supplements in Lebanon.
  3. There is a positive relation between due diligence and consumer behavior regarding the use of food supplements in Lebanon.
The questionnaire is divided into clear sections (consumer background, health awareness, ...)
 
#4
I have a questionnaire with different data nature, each few questions can be grouped into 1 variable (ex: Age, Gender, Region, Income Level into "Background"; Experienced Side Effects (multiple answers), Hospitalization (yes/no) into "Risks"...). I transformed the groups by means but would like to know how to proceed to analyze the relationships
Here's are the hypotheses:
  1. There is a positive relation between consumer background and consumer behavior regarding the use of food supplements in Lebanon
  2. There is a positive relation between consumer’s health awareness and consumer behavior regarding the use of food supplements in Lebanon.
  3. There is a positive relation between due diligence and consumer behavior regarding the use of food supplements in Lebanon.
The questionnaire is divided into clear sections (consumer background, health awareness, ...)

If you are simply looking for a positive relationship between two variables (and you are assuming it is a linear relationship) you can use pearson correlation. If both variables are not continuous, then you should look into other correlation measures such as Kendall's tau or Spearman's rho.