Ideal profile for MS in statistics?

#1
Hello all,

I'm brand new here, and so far the information I've found has been very valuable. I am currently a sophomore and I have tried gathering information about masters programs in statistics. Unfortunately, I have been unable to find what an ideal profile looks like for those looking to get a masters at a top notch program. Stanford does have a class profile on their website, but that is the best I've been able to find at this point. For those of you with knowledge of the masters programs, what would a "competitive" profile look like from the following criteria?(assume schools ranging from Minnesota/Wisconsin to Berkeley/Chicago).

Type of Undergrad Institution/Major:
Undergrad GPA:
GRE:
Math Classes:
Stats Classes:
Other Classes:
LOR:
Research Experience:

As a said, I'm only a sophomore so I'm looking for a little guidance to know where I should be by graduation. Also, I'm at a LAC and my statistics program is in its first year so my professors/advisors aren't really sure how to get students into graduate school, and I have no grad students to consult. Thanks for any help you can offer!

***Also, specifically, is real analysis recommended for MS in statistics preparation? Or would another applied statistics course bring more value?

EDIT: I do not plan on pursuing a PhD!
 

Dason

Ambassador to the humans
#2
Do you have any idea what your research interests are? Do you plan on doing something more methods oriented or more theory oriented?
 
#3
Ideally it would have a blend of theoretical and applied methods. In terms of specific interests, I'm not certain at this point, but topics that have piqued my interest are bayesian statistics, econometrics, and statistical applications to property/casualty insurance/reinsurance.
 

Dason

Ambassador to the humans
#4
***Also, specifically, is real analysis recommended for MS in statistics preparation? Or would another applied statistics course bring more value?

EDIT: I do not plan on pursuing a PhD!
I guess it partially depends on the program you'd be applying to but in my opinion you don't want to miss out on real analysis. Even for master's level statistics I think real analysis is an important class to have under your belt. It's more definitely more important if you're going for a PhD (which you said you aren't) but I still think it's a really good course to take if you can. Applied stats courses are great and can be really valuable but I think they're a little bit easier to teach yourself if you needed to than it would be to try to teach yourself higher level theory if you needed to.

So my recommendation is to definitely take real analysis. You probably only need a semester of it though so you probably wouldn't take real analysis 2 if your university offers it. But maybe you find out you like it a lot and then you learn that measure theory is interesting and then you realize that you do want to get a PhD to study higher level probability theory! (but probably not...)