My chances & options? Uncertain math background.

#1
My goal is to get a MA in Stats from a decent university, prefer Canada but America is fine too. I want to work in the public/private sector more than academia.

I have a BA in philosophy and am finishing a BSc in Economics. My average gpa across both degrees is going to be around 3.3, my final 2 years have an upward trend towards 3.8.

However, I'm not sure how strong my math background is. I don't have much math per se:confused:, but I do have quantitative Econ courses:

Calc I, II, III
Math 208 [Math for economics] = (Matrix algebra, solution to linear systems, quadratic forms; partial derivatives, constrained and unconstrained optimization)

Econ 245 & 246 [descriptive stats/probability] & [statistical inference]

ECON 350 [Mathematical Economics I] = (application of calculus and linear algebra to econ)
Econ 351 [Mathematical Economics II] = (Difference equations, differential equations, and dynamic optimization with applications to econ.)

Econ 353 [Computer Aided Modeling in Economics] = (numerical methods and their application in economics.)

Econ 365 [Econometrics I] = (Estimation of the regression model; sampling properties of estimators; testing restrictions; restricted least squares.)
Econ 366 [Econometrics II] = (Stochastic regressors; Dummy variables; multicollinearity; instrumental variables estimation; seemingly unrelated regressions. generalized least squares; maximum likelihood; aspects of specification analysis; dynamic models; simultaneous equation models.)

I know courses in linear algebra and real analysis are very important for Stats programs, but I just don't have time to take them. Are they absolutely necessary?

So you see, I have very little actual stats/math courses. But my economics courses have a lot of stats in them.

I'm hoping for a fall 2012 entrance somewhere average, I don't think any top-tier place will be in reach. Any suggestions on where I may have a good shot?

Thanks! :p
 
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fed1

TS Contributor
#2
you could get into very good school with background like this. Most just require All calcs and linear algebra. The more money you have the more they overlook certain things. Stat programs in Math departments are hardest to get into. good luck:wave:
 
#3
you could get into very good school with background like this. Most just require All calcs and linear algebra. The more money you have the more they overlook certain things. Stat programs in Math departments are hardest to get into. good luck:wave:
isn't my overall gpa too low to get into a good school?
and the lack of linear algebra :/

I don't think money is that big of an issue, I'm just worried about my grades and math
 

Outlier

TS Contributor
#4
There are library books on college placement that can help you assess your odds, and library books on decision theory to help you figure out your 'utility function' and make your choice.

I got into a grad school on provisional status [had to get at least B's for the first few courses] only a year after a guy who had better grades than me and he had to take remedial courses to get in.
Things change. Don't judge yourself; that's their job.
 
#5
Thanks guys. It seems that in America the GRE matters a bit. Here in Canada they only require international students to take it.

Should I do it anyway?
 

spunky

Can't make spagetti
#6
I know courses in linear algebra and real analysis are very important for Stats programs, but I just don't have time to take them. Are they absolutely necessary?
I can only talk about my experience at UBC and the answer would be a sound "yes". even in their webpage they specify that candidates which have had both real analysis (although they prefer both real and complex analysis) and some 4th year years courses in probability (distribution theory, for instance) are given priority. the issue is that, although i have only taken 2 courses in economics, i can see they teach you some of the theory of why things work and a lot on how to use them... but they dont go through the formal process of the golden standard in mathematics, how to create proofs. real analysis was, at least for me, a good intro course on how to construct proofs and if you dont have those skills it ain't good...

i also see only 1 course on linear algebra (not counting the econ one)...did they go into vector spaces? the whole theory behind the matrix inverse and all that stuff? if you could take at least a 2nd year course on linear algebra from the math dept and not the econ one, that would definitely help. or dazzle them with some sort of research idea you've been working on!

hope that helps...