Using racial distribution for a population data as a reference

Fay

New Member
#1
Hi everyone,
I have data on employee exit status. This data is for employees’ status (still employed/exited) for all the employees that have been employed or exited so far in an organisation, so it is a population data. I am analysing the data and looking for the correlation of the employees’ status and other variables such as start year, department, education level, etc. In this analysis I will be controlling for race.
My question is, since this is a population data I don’t see the need to run any statistical analysis, however I was wondering if it is valid to use the status distribution by race as a reference/guide. For example if I compare the status by race and department against the reference to show that the department has a significant impact, would that be valid?

Thanks!
 

hlsmith

Less is more. Stay pure. Stay poor.
#2
however I was wondering if it is valid to use the status distribution by race as a reference/guide. For example if I compare the status by race and department against the reference to show that the department has a significant impact, would that be valid?

Thanks!
Please better describe this, it currently isn't clear what you plan to do. Also, since this is time to event data, a proportional hazards model may be more appropriate.
 

Fay

New Member
#3
Please better describe this, it currently isn't clear what you plan to do. Also, since this is time to event data, a proportional hazards model may be more appropriate.
Thank you for your response,
Let’s say that the exit rate for all the employees that have been employed so far in an organisation (population) is; white employees 25%, African American 30%, Asian 15%,etc.
And when looking at the rates of the exit status for each race and their department the output was;
CEO office: white 10%, African American 7%, Asian 6%....
Human Resources; white 2%, African American 10%, Asian 6%....
Since this is a population data, I am not sure if I need to use statistical tests to estimate the correlation between employee exit by race and their department. But I was wondering if we can use the original exit rates by race for my population as a reference to estimate the extent of the correlation.

Thanks
 

hlsmith

Less is more. Stay pure. Stay poor.
#4
If you are just desiring to report on historic data and are not generalizing or predicting, then you are correct. So your conclusions will be your conclusions. Though you can still use stats (means, correlations, rates), you just don't have to add precision values (confidence intervals or conduct null hypothesis testing).
 

Fay

New Member
#5
If you are just desiring to report on historic data and are not generalizing or predicting, then you are correct. So your conclusions will be your conclusions. Though you can still use stats (means, correlations, rates), you just don't have to add precision values (confidence intervals or conduct null hypothesis testing).
Thank you so much for your help!