What do YOU mean by "statistically significant"?

DAV

New Member
#21
Funny - I wonder where these "statistically knowledgeable" MBAs are. I've yet to meet one. :p
LOL. The basic concepts in statistics are pretty simple. Some of the associated math is not. If your definition of "statistically knowledgeable" means knowing when Mann-Whitney or Durban-Watson is appropriate, then so be it. Just don't confuse that type of knowledge with understanding the core.

An example: I have training as an electrical engineer but it has been years since I've had to seriously apply any of it. Some might argue that means I'm not really, or at least no longer, an electrical engineer. They may actually have a point as my experience has stopped increasing. I don't kid myself in this either. Still, I'm quite handy around circuits and have designed many however if a parasitic oscillation appears I'm far more likely to hire someone more inclined to treat problems of this sort as bread and butter and, hopefully, with more recent experience than to try to solve it myself.

I don't have an MBA but I spent quite some time working with the dean of my university's graduate school of business doing market and advertising studies. Not all schools are the same but I got the impression that a working knowledge of statistics (among other things) was a requirement for an MBA candidate.
 

JohnM

TS Contributor
#22
Not all schools are the same but I got the impression that a working knowledge of statistics (among other things) was a requirement for an MBA candidate.
Most programs only require 1 course, possibly but rarely 2, unless they are enrolled in a specific quant program. For the most part, it isn't the MBAs who are conducting real market/ad research - it's people with advanced degrees in stats and/or psych, or those who specialize in marketing or market research. People I work with who have a technical undergrad degree combined with an MBA know a lot more, but as is typical with MBAs, they think they know a lot more than they actually do....:D
 
#24
For the most part, it isn't the MBAs who are conducting real market/ad research - it's people with advanced degrees in stats and/or psych, or those who specialize in marketing or market research. People I work with who have a technical undergrad degree combined with an MBA know a lot more, but as is typical with MBAs, they think they know a lot more than they actually do....:D
As a recovering MBA myself, I feel like I should speak up (especially since I initiated this post)... unfortunately, I don't think I can debate any of this! :rolleyes:

I suppose the reason I am now gravitating to stats work is because, as you allude, MBA jobs don't tend to allow for detailed knowledge-building. Nothing wrong with that and of course this world needs all types, it just wasn't me.

So despite my late-blooming, I'd like to think there is hope for me in the stats world! I believe a number of prominent "statisticians" like Tukey actually came from other backgrounds. In fact, I've read arguments that it's a good thing when those who come from the business side can do the stats analysis, as opposed to relying on someone else.

In any case, speaking on behalf of other MBA'ers and non-stats-trained folks here, I definitely appreciate continued grace and responses to our posts! :) And circling back to the original intent of this post, I think it's nice to see the recognition that communication with our customers, not just the actual analytical work, is a relevant issue to be thinking about.
 

JohnM

TS Contributor
#25
As a recovering MBA myself, I feel like I should speak up (especially since I initiated this post)... unfortunately, I don't think I can debate any of this! :rolleyes:

I suppose the reason I am now gravitating to stats work is because, as you allude, MBA jobs don't tend to allow for detailed knowledge-building. Nothing wrong with that and of course this world needs all types, it just wasn't me.

So despite my late-blooming, I'd like to think there is hope for me in the stats world! I believe a number of prominent "statisticians" like Tukey actually came from other backgrounds. In fact, I've read arguments that it's a good thing when those who come from the business side can do the stats analysis, as opposed to relying on someone else.

In any case, speaking on behalf of other MBA'ers and non-stats-trained folks here, I definitely appreciate continued grace and responses to our posts! :) And circling back to the original intent of this post, I think it's nice to see the recognition that communication with our customers, not just the actual analytical work, is a relevant issue to be thinking about.
jawon,

Based on the nature of your question, and your insights, I think you're well on your way. Hopefully you didn't take offense to my good-natured ribbing :D Glad we were able to attract you away from the dark side:D

the best discussions evolve from these philosophical questions....:tup:
 
#26
Hopefully you didn't take offense to my good-natured ribbing :D Glad we were able to attract you away from the dark side:D
JohnM, the dark side has been good so far, due much to a community like this where people are willing to share their knowledge. And of course no offense taken, though I won't speak for others! :eek: